Value responsiveness

Do you value responsiveness?

Do you consider responsiveness a value?

Is it important to you that someone with whom you have a personal or business connection is “quick to respond or react appropriately or sympathetically”?

It may seem out of line with values such as integrity, respect, honesty and responsibility but responsiveness is a tremendously important value that seems to be slipping away from many in both the personal and business world. Responsiveness may be corroding, in part, because of the technology that on the surface seems to help us stay better connected. However, the blame cannot be all technology’s because responsiveness is a human value not an algorithm.

We all get emails, texts and (sometimes) letters and phone calls daily. They can pile up, especially if you’re running a business or a school or an organization large or small. However, not responding to these messages sends a message whether you intend it to or not.

“If someone walked up to you and asked you a question, would you turn around and walk away from them without responding? Would you ever do that to someone?” asked Shana Rossi, director of admissions at Padua Academy and consultant with Partners in Mission. Yet, not responding to emails, texts and phone calls does essentially that. It turns around and walks away from someone without a word.

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Caution: sign ahead

Communicating through pictures —  and, more specifically, signs — can be a powerful way to send a message.

My daughter commented the other day that on our rural street there are not many signs. No bent arrows indicating sharp curves ahead. No speed limit indicators. Nothing telling you to “keep right” or “yield.” There is, however, a sign with a picture of a cow. Below it is another sign that reads “loose gravel.”

Loose gravel and cows ahead

Clearly there could be cows ahead, and the road is covered with loose gravel instead of smooth pavement. I live on this road and it makes for interesting travel (and running), but I digress.

I’ve started to notice these types of signs popping up in more locations. Using just color and a simple black silhouette picture, the signs communicate a message. They also tell a story.

In my commute from country to city, two signs I pass tell the story of a journey. There is this:

Tractor warning

And then this, about 35 miles away:

Fore!

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Communicating well

Remembering some old rules of writing that still apply.

“But with so many words having many meanings communication can be a bit precarious.” Someone left that comment on the Two Roads Communications Facebook page. It’s true. Communication is precarious.

To communicate well is not easy. Look around: There is a lot of lousy communication. To communicate well, one must transfer an idea clearly from a thought into words (or pictures or other forms of art) that others understand. That can be tricky, because we all interpret things differently.

My husband and I have both worked in the communications field. We joke that we communicate well with everyone but each other. Emotion has a lot to do with communication among loved ones. But in business, taking excessive emotion and subjectivity out of communication can improve its clarity. Professional communications therefore strive to create messages that can be clearly understood by all.

Writing should be provocative, creative and concise. It can be those things and still be simple. Be understood clearly. Be done well.

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How we came to Two Roads

A new road, winding but paved.

The name Two Roads Communications comes quite literally from the Robert Frost poem, “The Road Not Taken”. It also comes figuratively from a long journey.

I like to run. You think a lot when you run alone, which I often do. When I first began formulating the idea of starting my own communications business after 25 years as a journalist then communications director and freelance communications consultant, I was in a slump with my running. AND, I could not think of what I wanted to name my business.  I needed those runs to help me clear my head.  I thought maybe running in new places might give me the kick I needed to get my running game back and help me brainstorm.

So one afternoon, I ran down a new road near a local farm.

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The launch

Two Roads Communications logo

I’d like to introduce myself to you. My name is Barbara Esteves-Moore, and I am chief executive officer and chief idea generator for Two Roads Communications. I have worked in journalism, communications and marketing for nearly 25 years. The seeds for my career were planted when I was young. If my mother were writing this post, she would tell you a story about how I used to pretend I was a news broadcaster. Standing in the bathroom, I would read the news into the mirror pretending it was my camera. A hair brush served as my microphone. That childhood play led to an interest in current events, history and writing. I earned my bachelor’s degree in mass communications with a minor in print journalism, studying at both Boston University and the University of New Orleans.

Of course, the communications field has changed dramatically during my career. The shift from print to web, from mass media to social media, and from traditional marketing studies to SEO have kept my career path interesting, challenging and fresh. As I began to write, edit and design for various mediums as a side project, the idea for Two Roads Communications began to form.

In 2017, the company was launched! It is based in College Grove, Tennessee, where I live with my husband, my daughter, my dog and two horses.